Opinion and rants

The Session #133 Announcement – Hometown Glories

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For this month’s edition of the Session, the proposed subject is ‘Hometown Glories’. Take this and run with it how you wish, but when thinking about possible subjects I had in mind an imminent visit to the place I spent my formative years and blogging about it’s highlights and wider beer scene. Possible starting points could be –

  •  Describing the types of bars/pubs you have in your home town, how popular are they? Has craft beer culture made much of a splash?
  • Are there any well-known breweries? Is there a particular beer or style that is synonymous with your home town
  • History of the town and how that can be reflected in its drinking culture
  • Tales of your youth, early drinking stories
  • Ruminations on what once was and what is now? Have you moved away and been pleasantly surprised or disappointed on return visits?

My visit over the next week is going to hopefully inspire me, and it’s a great excuse to visit a few old haunts and new venues. If you’re less enamoured with your hometown, or even if you left and never returned, feel free to respond anyway – maybe you’re an adopted native of somewhere better. My home town is no longer my home, so if you’d like to write about the place you feel most at home in relation to beer, that would be welcomed too.

I’m hoping this will spark a wide range of topics within the wider theme, and I look forward to reading your responses. Tag me in on Twitter – @barrelagedleeds – or comment below with a link if you prefer, by or on Friday the 2nd March.

Happy blogging!

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Opinion and rants

Try, Try and Try again

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As I’m sure you’re all tired of hearing, I, along with many other volunteers participated in the Tryanuary campaign this year, trying to organise events and generally encourage people to visit pubs and try something new. Judging by the levels of engagement on social media and attendance at various events it looks to have been a successful month, and I thought I’d put down a few notes on the campaign, how it was received, and where I think it could go in the future.

From a personal perspective, the Tryanuary efforts this year were a positive thing – not just because of the aim of the campaign, but also because it isn’t designed to aggressively critique the choice of people who have sworn off booze for the month. Its a tricky balance to strike, but publicising events, breweries etc was done in a non-judgemental way, and I didn’t see anyone who was speaking on behalf of the campaign adopting an overly anti-dryanuary stance, which isn’t to say no-one did.

In response to both campaigns, there were also a fair number of ‘Why?’ comments. Aside from the predictable ‘why do we need a campaign for something I do anyway? -missing the point that we’re not aiming our efforts at regular pub goers – there were others which actually raised a number of useful points, for example ‘Why are we seemingly focusing almost exclusively on ‘craft’ breweries and pubs – shouldn’t the campaign encourage patronage across the industry as a whole?’ Which, I kind of agree with – after all, with the high rate of pub closure across the UK, more effort needs to be made to encourage visiting local pubs. If your response to this is, ‘why? My local serves crap beer/has no atmosphere/the staff are unwelcoming’, then without your presence, mentioning what you’d like to see,  talking to the management, then nothing will change. It might not change even if you did go more, but its worth trying at least isn’t it?

Through the events that we and others helped organise this month, the best part for me has been meeting other drinkers, brewers and industry staff and chatting about future ideas and plans in great pubs/bars. I would like to see a renewed focus on venues for next year’s campaign as whilst we all want to celebrate our favourite beers and breweries, in order for this to continue to flourish the on-trade needs to recover from a pretty dismal 10-20 years. One common question I saw from pubs and bars was ‘how do we get noticed?’. Given the all pervading nature of Social Media, it almost seems alien to some that the vast majority of premises don’t know how to, or prefer not to, utilise these tools to publicise themselves. I’m not an expert either, but perhaps if you are, then providing informal support and advice in this regard to businesses in your area would be welcomed.

Going forward, I will undoubtedly continue supporting the bars and pubs that I enjoy visiting the most, but my aim this year is to diversify the types of places I drink in, and to encourage people who don’t often bother visiting pubs to come along. Why not start a work pub club, for example? Undoubtedly, some pubs are and will remain, rubbish, but at least get out there and see what’s on offer.  All year round!

 

 

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Opinion and rants

The Session #132 – Home Brewing Conversations

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For this month’s collective beer blogging session, Jon at The Brewsite has proposed the topic of Home brewing as a jumping off point for us to explore.

My only experience of home brewing so far was definitely a lesson, possibly even a disaster. My generous other half purchased an all-grain kit from Brooklyn Brewshop for me as a christmas present, following on from a crash course I had taken the year before at Learn to Brew. Whilst I enjoyed learning about the process, my initial excitement was slightly tempered by the investment of time and money it takes to create a decent beer at home, so at least with the kit everything I needed had been provided for me, and with clear instructions. What could possibly go wrong?

Well, nothing, at first at least. I mashed in on the gas burners in a large stockpot. Keeping the mash temperature constant was difficult, but with with a decent food thermometer I managed to keep it within a reasonable range. Transfer proved a much bigger challenge, especially as I didn’t have a spare second pot, but again I muddled through. With the wort hopped, cooled (in ice water in the kitchen sink), and transferred to the carboy, so far so good.

My downfall was in the bottling stage. Whilst my mash had been far less efficient than I wanted it to be (according to the gravity readings) the fermented product looked and smelt good. According to the instructions, I was now to dissolve one cup of honey with one cup of water, and pour the beer in, then siphon from here into the bottles. Judging by the auto-drainpour of my self-emptying bottles two weeks later, with hindsight I wished I had taken more care at this stage….The gush was forceful, not quite ceiling height, but definitely akin to 12 mini-geysers.

So, would I have another crack at it? Yes, mainly because my partner has bought me another kit (she is much more persistent and determined than I), but also because for any beer enthusiast, home brewing seems like something you *have* to try, and by try I mean have a sustained attempt at creating something half decent. It has a certain cache that shows you can grasp beer on a deeper sense, and also, I imagine, gives you a certain sense of satisfaction at having handiwork worth sharing.

Luckily for me, this next kit has a packet of proper priming sugar…

 

 

 

 

 

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