Reviews and events

Festival of Brewers Focus – Meanwood Brewery

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Nestled between Headingley and Chapel Allerton, Meanwood was for a while just the space in-between its livelier, trendier neighbours. Unless you lived there, you were mainly just passing through on the route to have fun elsewhere. However, over the last ten years there has been a slow trickle of openings and expansions that have resulted in Meanwood being a destination in itself. There’s certainly a range of good beer bars and pubs, and latterly this is looking even healthier due to the creation of the Meanwood Brewery and their subsequent plans.

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Meanwood Brewery is the result of brotherly love, with Graeme and his brother Baz deciding to take their homebrewing hobby to the next level. With a 1hl kit being upgraded soon to a 3hl beast, the brothers are certainly moving apace – the ultimate aim is to open ‘Terminus’, a microbrewpub in the old tram terminus. With beers in Cask, Keg and rather slinky Bottles, their range stretches from ‘Pilgrim’, a NEIPA, to ‘Trickster’, a strong Saison, to ‘Exile’ a Blackberry Crumble Berliner Weisse, all of which will be on their Bar at Festival of Brewers, along with casks of ‘Totem’, a 6.2% American Brown Ale, ‘Arecibo Message’, a 5.7% American Pale Ale, and ‘Heroic’, a 5% English IPA.

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If you can’t attend the Festival of Brewers for some unimaginable reason, you’ll find their bottles at the usual places – Alfred, Beer Ritz, Raynville Superstore, Growlers, Caspar’s Bottle Shop and George and Joseph, as well as at Alley Cats and Corner Cafe, in Pop up events at Tandem and the occasional keg in Wapentake. Baz is excited about ‘getting to work alongside so many great breweries from the area and trying some of their beers with the public’ and if you haven’t already snapped up a ticket, his advice is simple. ‘Get one. You definitely don’t want to miss out on this one’.

About the Festival of Brewers

The first ever Festival of Brewers event takes place on 29th and 30thJune 2018, with New Craven Hall hosting, which can be found just one-mile South of Leeds City Train Station.

All too often, independent beer festivals choose to focus their attention on the same, larger, popular UK craft breweries. This makes it difficult for the hundreds of smaller breweries across the UK to share the spotlight. Festival of Brewers aims to address that by only showcasing the small and independent breweries.

You can find out all the information, including participating breweries and street food vendors, tickets and how to find the venue on the website www.festivalofbrewers.co.uk.

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Opinion and rants

Festival of Brewers Focus – Eyes Brewing

Starting up a brewery seems hard. Especially to an outsider, like me, who hasn’t and will probably never try. So kudos from me to anyone who gives it a go, especially when it’s a unique concept such as that of EYES Brewing. EYES have started up the UK’s one and only Wheat-focused brewery, and they also think that it is the first of its kind anywhere in the world since the Second World War.

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As well as having an original concept for their brewery, Dan, Chris and Tom also have a pretty eventful back story, as explained by Dan. ‘After my little girl was born I stepped away from a career in stand up comedy and back in to teaching.  After going on a day of brewing with Andy and Steve from Learn to Brew, now Crooked Brewing, Tom and I started to get into the theory and make up of beer. As I was building an extension on my house, my wife suggested we build a little bit on the back to put a small brew house in. I paid for the room, Chris and Tom paid for the brewery, and then EYES home brewing was born.’

From banding together over a 100L kit, things progressed when Chris  had the opportunity to become an assistant brewer under master brewer Al (now at Brass Castle) at Ainsty Ales in York, learning how to brew on scale. However, things weren’t running as smoothly for Dan in this period. ‘I was struggling with depression and ended up in hospital. The school I was working for were incredibly supportive until they saw a photo of me at York CAMRA Beer festival’. Disappointingly, the school then changed tack and pressured Dan to quit his job, resulting in a legal battle which ended with him being awarded compensation for his unfair treatment.

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Eventually, alongside a small business loan EYES finally had enough money to buy a van, a fleet of casks and ingredients for the first few brews. In December 2016 they started to sell their first beer, cuckoo brewed at Ainsty Ales, an arrangement which has worked well leading to them brewing at various places in and around Yorkshire. The EYES team is now a quartet of Dan, Chris, Nev and Tom.

EYES are looking to stand out with their range of Wheaty treats, in particular one from the darker end of the scale. ‘Dark Harvest will be a stand out for people as it is one of the world’s first ever Black Hopfenweisses. When we started brewing we started to make German style Hefeweizens as this is what we loved to drink. We then decided to see if we could create more British and American styles of beer but continue to keep over 50% wheat in the grist. Our first ever sale was in Whitelocks which we found incredible, and we will be bringing some exciting cask beer as well as cans’.

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The EYES crew are looking forward to attending Festival of Brewers, and are relishing the thought of being a part of a small, independent event. ‘This is like an underground gig for bands to look out for. Leeds has an incredible history when it comes to brewing and this is the future. I think people should get a ticket to see some of the innovation and up and coming stars of this great City of Beer. Though we are pretty much a festival of relative unknowns in the beer world we have a lot of variety amongst us. This is what I am looking forward to. There will be so many different beer styles to get. You won’t get sick of the same beers again and again like you may at other festivals’

About the Festival of Brewers

The first ever Festival of Brewers event takes place on 29th and 30thJune 2018, with New Craven Hall hosting, which can be found just one-mile South of Leeds City Train Station.

All too often, independent beer festivals choose to focus their attention on the same, larger, popular UK craft breweries. This makes it difficult for the hundreds of smaller breweries across the UK to share the spotlight. Festival of Brewers aims to address that by only showcasing the small and independent breweries.

You can find out all the information, including participating breweries and street food vendors, tickets and how to find the venue on the website www.festivalofbrewers.co.uk.

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Opinion and rants

Remember when…

Remember when you could get a pint for less than three quid? Remember when pubs used to smell interesting? Remember when you could order a drink without being stuck behind people waiting for Gin cocktails? Remember when everywhere shut at 11pm? Remember when pubs closed in the afternoons? Remember when this place was heaving every lunchtime? Remember when I could drink six pints without needing a piss? Remember when she used to be in here with me every night? Remember when the police were called? Remember when this place got shut down?

No?

Just me then?

I’ll have a lucky dip for tonight too….and some green Rizla.

Ta mate.

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Opinion and rants

The Session #133 Announcement – Hometown Glories

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For this month’s edition of the Session, the proposed subject is ‘Hometown Glories’. Take this and run with it how you wish, but when thinking about possible subjects I had in mind an imminent visit to the place I spent my formative years and blogging about it’s highlights and wider beer scene. Possible starting points could be –

  •  Describing the types of bars/pubs you have in your home town, how popular are they? Has craft beer culture made much of a splash?
  • Are there any well-known breweries? Is there a particular beer or style that is synonymous with your home town
  • History of the town and how that can be reflected in its drinking culture
  • Tales of your youth, early drinking stories
  • Ruminations on what once was and what is now? Have you moved away and been pleasantly surprised or disappointed on return visits?

My visit over the next week is going to hopefully inspire me, and it’s a great excuse to visit a few old haunts and new venues. If you’re less enamoured with your hometown, or even if you left and never returned, feel free to respond anyway – maybe you’re an adopted native of somewhere better. My home town is no longer my home, so if you’d like to write about the place you feel most at home in relation to beer, that would be welcomed too.

I’m hoping this will spark a wide range of topics within the wider theme, and I look forward to reading your responses. Tag me in on Twitter – @barrelagedleeds – or comment below with a link if you prefer, by or on Friday the 2nd March.

Happy blogging!

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Opinion and rants

Try, Try and Try again

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As I’m sure you’re all tired of hearing, I, along with many other volunteers participated in the Tryanuary campaign this year, trying to organise events and generally encourage people to visit pubs and try something new. Judging by the levels of engagement on social media and attendance at various events it looks to have been a successful month, and I thought I’d put down a few notes on the campaign, how it was received, and where I think it could go in the future.

From a personal perspective, the Tryanuary efforts this year were a positive thing – not just because of the aim of the campaign, but also because it isn’t designed to aggressively critique the choice of people who have sworn off booze for the month. Its a tricky balance to strike, but publicising events, breweries etc was done in a non-judgemental way, and I didn’t see anyone who was speaking on behalf of the campaign adopting an overly anti-dryanuary stance, which isn’t to say no-one did.

In response to both campaigns, there were also a fair number of ‘Why?’ comments. Aside from the predictable ‘why do we need a campaign for something I do anyway? -missing the point that we’re not aiming our efforts at regular pub goers – there were others which actually raised a number of useful points, for example ‘Why are we seemingly focusing almost exclusively on ‘craft’ breweries and pubs – shouldn’t the campaign encourage patronage across the industry as a whole?’ Which, I kind of agree with – after all, with the high rate of pub closure across the UK, more effort needs to be made to encourage visiting local pubs. If your response to this is, ‘why? My local serves crap beer/has no atmosphere/the staff are unwelcoming’, then without your presence, mentioning what you’d like to see,  talking to the management, then nothing will change. It might not change even if you did go more, but its worth trying at least isn’t it?

Through the events that we and others helped organise this month, the best part for me has been meeting other drinkers, brewers and industry staff and chatting about future ideas and plans in great pubs/bars. I would like to see a renewed focus on venues for next year’s campaign as whilst we all want to celebrate our favourite beers and breweries, in order for this to continue to flourish the on-trade needs to recover from a pretty dismal 10-20 years. One common question I saw from pubs and bars was ‘how do we get noticed?’. Given the all pervading nature of Social Media, it almost seems alien to some that the vast majority of premises don’t know how to, or prefer not to, utilise these tools to publicise themselves. I’m not an expert either, but perhaps if you are, then providing informal support and advice in this regard to businesses in your area would be welcomed.

Going forward, I will undoubtedly continue supporting the bars and pubs that I enjoy visiting the most, but my aim this year is to diversify the types of places I drink in, and to encourage people who don’t often bother visiting pubs to come along. Why not start a work pub club, for example? Undoubtedly, some pubs are and will remain, rubbish, but at least get out there and see what’s on offer.  All year round!

 

 

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Opinion and rants

The Session #132 – Home Brewing Conversations

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For this month’s collective beer blogging session, Jon at The Brewsite has proposed the topic of Home brewing as a jumping off point for us to explore.

My only experience of home brewing so far was definitely a lesson, possibly even a disaster. My generous other half purchased an all-grain kit from Brooklyn Brewshop for me as a christmas present, following on from a crash course I had taken the year before at Learn to Brew. Whilst I enjoyed learning about the process, my initial excitement was slightly tempered by the investment of time and money it takes to create a decent beer at home, so at least with the kit everything I needed had been provided for me, and with clear instructions. What could possibly go wrong?

Well, nothing, at first at least. I mashed in on the gas burners in a large stockpot. Keeping the mash temperature constant was difficult, but with with a decent food thermometer I managed to keep it within a reasonable range. Transfer proved a much bigger challenge, especially as I didn’t have a spare second pot, but again I muddled through. With the wort hopped, cooled (in ice water in the kitchen sink), and transferred to the carboy, so far so good.

My downfall was in the bottling stage. Whilst my mash had been far less efficient than I wanted it to be (according to the gravity readings) the fermented product looked and smelt good. According to the instructions, I was now to dissolve one cup of honey with one cup of water, and pour the beer in, then siphon from here into the bottles. Judging by the auto-drainpour of my self-emptying bottles two weeks later, with hindsight I wished I had taken more care at this stage….The gush was forceful, not quite ceiling height, but definitely akin to 12 mini-geysers.

So, would I have another crack at it? Yes, mainly because my partner has bought me another kit (she is much more persistent and determined than I), but also because for any beer enthusiast, home brewing seems like something you *have* to try, and by try I mean have a sustained attempt at creating something half decent. It has a certain cache that shows you can grasp beer on a deeper sense, and also, I imagine, gives you a certain sense of satisfaction at having handiwork worth sharing.

Luckily for me, this next kit has a packet of proper priming sugar…

 

 

 

 

 

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Opinion and rants

Golden Pints 2017

 

Whilst generally this year has been a good year for beer, looking through my untappd check-ins it doesn’t appear to have been a vintage one personally. Casting aside bottleshare sips of aged, one off and extremely rare or unusual beers, it took me quite a while of scrolling through the list to find a nominee for every category that I rated highly, and that I returned to. Maybe I’m a bit jaded, or maybe my standards have risen. Certainly, for me, while I haven’t found anything to overly dislike this year a lot of beers have seemed indistinct, with the same flavours and textures – particularly at the hoppier end of the spectrum. A lot of my choices are old favourites, existing Breweries that have raised their game, or venues that I cherish.

Picking winners for each category is always difficult, but more so this year when I’ve been drinking pretty much exclusively UK beer and also not making many ventures to pastures new – its been a year of, well, not exactly sticking to what I know, but perhaps reining back on the extremes of looking for the ‘new’.

Best UK Cask Beer – Tough choices here, but in what is fast becoming a yearly tradition  I am voting for Magic Rock High Wire again…why vote for anything else other than repeated perfection?

Best UK Keg Beer – Marble Beers’ Gale’s Prize Old Ale (Bourbon Barrel Aged) was an utter delight at Dark City – so good I almost immediately went back for more. To be fair, this would probably also win best bottled beer, if I wasn’t saving the bottles I have in the cupboard. Verdant’s Maybe one more PSI was also a memorable glass amongst the tide of Murk, as was Magic Rock Brewing’s Psychokinesis – Sorachi goes well with the new breed of IPA – why aren’t we seeing more of this?

Best UK Bottled Beer – Kernel never let me down, and their Biere De Saison Perle Simcoe was one of the most memorable beers of the year. Lost and Grounded’s Keller Pils was also a fridge staple.

Best UK Canned Beer – Summer Wine take the nod for this category. It was great to see them back on the shelves, and Pico Diego was a low-abv revelation. Also,  Cloudwater Brewing get all the headlines for their DIPAs, and I’m sure they won’t be short of nominations in this category for those, but I enjoyed their range of IPLs even more – especially the Autumn + Winter IPL El Dorado Mosaic which filled my fridge in February

Best Overseas Draught – I haven’t been dipping my toe in these waters much, but all the Other Half Brewing beers I’ve tried at Hop City/elsewhere on occasion have been great. Double Mosaic Dream in particular. I also usually enjoy Dugges Bryggeri when I see it – Big Idjit did it for me.

Best Overseas Bottled Beer – Not a new beer, but Brouwerij De Ranke’s XX Bitter always keeps me going with its unrelenting bitterness. In a similar vein – De Dolle Arabier was also something I drank quite a few of.

Best Overseas Canned Beer – I rarely buy these, so I’d have to go with a nostalgic hooray for the return to these shores of Odell St. Lupulin – I still love it.

Best Collaboration Brew – Fuller’s combining with Marble Beers for Gale’s Prize Old Ale, but also a gracious nomination for the Fuller’s and Friends collabs with Marble and Moor. Cloudwater and The Veil also made a can of peach juice called Chubbles that was pretty delicious as well.

Best Overall Beer – Third mention for Marble Beers for Gale’s Prize Old Ale. I’ve praised it twice already, so enough said. Champion.

Best Branding – Leeds’ own Eyes Brewing have lots of designs that catch the eye. Abstract and unique.

Best Pump Clip – Erm…the new Harvey’s clips are a nice shade of Turquoise….

Best Bottle/Can Label – Northern Monk’s Patrons Project cans deserve to take this award for the sheer amount of effort that goes into every one, the Ingleborough Session Porter is just one outstanding example amongst many. Also, I very much admire the shiny cans from Burnt Mill – contents were pretty decent too.

Best UK Brewery – Always tough, and I usually stay within the Yorkshire boundaries, but this year I’m going for Marble – Gale’s Prize old Ale series, White Wine Pugin, Your Betrayal,

Best Overseas Brewery – Dugges for the beers I’ve tried this year, but overall I still drink more beers from Belgium than any other country outside the UK, so De Ranke.

Best Pub/Bar of the Year – I don’t like picking a best for this category, as mine changes visit by visit, but I’ve really enjoyed my end of the night visits to The Turk’s Head. Cosy and calm, with great beer and service.

Best New Pub/Bar of the Year – It is great to see The Cardigan Arms reopened and revived by Kirkstall Brewery – as lovely as it should be, and with enough of the touches that beer geeks like, but also keeping accessible and friendly to all.

Beer Festival of the Year – Leeds International Beer Festival obviously, but Hop/Dark City were also great this year, and will go from strength to strength.

Supermarket of the Year – Morrisons for keeping their range fresh for a few fridge fillers.

Independent Retailer of the Year – I’m not going to pick a winner, as we are so utterly spolit in Leeds that I rotate my visits between 4/5 shops, but Little Leeds Beer House is somewhere I always visit when I’m in town, and Raynville Superstore is expanding ever more. Both excellent places to stand, chat and choose.

Online Retailer of the Year – I only ordered beer online once this year, and was left a little disappointed. So meh.

Best Beer Book or Magazine – Boak and Bailey’s 20th Century Pub – it’s about so much more than beer, and an essential read for anyone trying to understand the history of UK drinking culture.

Best Beer Blog or Website – Again, Boak and Bailey – I don’t think there is anywhere that is producing such a variety of great articles that isn’t a full time, paid operation. Good Beer Hunting always come up with interesting perspectives, and there’s plenty of full time and amateur bloggers out there whose sites I regularly read – they know who they are. Shout out to Hopinions as well for filling my bus journeys with an hour (or more) of beery content every week.

Simon Johnson award for Best Beer Twitterer – I’m not going to pick a favourite here, but shouts go to @6TownsMart – travels through Europe and the UK, with plenty of excellent beer tips, @thebeernut – fully formed Beer reviews, with a side of pithy humour and @RowettBrew – pisstaking, homebrewing and general LOLage.

 

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